Stubble Burning Current Affairs - 2019

Category Wise PDF Compilations available at This Link

ICAR report on Stubble Burning

On 4th November, 2019, the ICAR’s Creams Laboratory bulletin stated that there has been reduction of 12% in incidents of Stubble Burning as compared to the same period in 2018.

Highlights of the report

  • There were 31,402 burning events in the three states Punjab, Uttar Pradesh and Haryana as on October 1, 2019
  • The state wise reduction in stubble burning as compared to 2018 is as follows
    • Uttar Pradesh-48.2%
    • Haryana-11.7%
    • Punjab-8.7%
  • The report says that the reduction is mainly due to the launch of Central Scheme “Promotional of Agricultural Mechanization of In-Situ Management of Crop Residue in Punjab, UP and Haryana and NCT of Delhi”. The main purpose of the scheme is to subsidize machinery required.

Delhi

New Delhi is worst affected due to stubble burning in the three states. This year (2019) the Air quality Index of Delhi reached 999. This is the highest recorded AQI of Delhi in its history. According to WHO norms the AQI should be under 100.

Also, the PM 2.5 (Particulate Matter) concentration was more than 80% as against 50% of the normal course.

Western Disturbances

The Stubble burning smoke reaching Delhi is greatly influenced by the Western Disturbances. When these Cyclonic circulation are strong and persistent the smoke deposited in the city decreases.

The disturbances are capable of carrying the smoke far and spread them wide when they are strong. The weakening of these disturbances lately due to global warming is also one of the reasons for the increased stubble smoke in Delhi.

Bio Bricks from Agri waste

The researchers from IIT Hyderabad and School of Architecture, Bhubaneswar have developed bio-bricks from agricultural waste. The product serves dual purposes of development of eco-friendly sustainable material and also waste management.

The Process

  • The Bagasse from agricultural waste is chopped to desired size.
  • A lime-based slurry is prepared.
  • The chopped agro-waste is added to the slurry and mixed thoroughly using a mixer to form a homogenous mixture.
  • The mixture is then poured into the molds.
  • The molds are then rammed with wooden blocks to create compact bricks.
  • The bricks attain strength after a month of air drying.

Significance

  • The bricks are made from agro-waste like wheat straw, paddy straw, sugarcane bagasse and cotton plant.
  • Bio-bricks are more sustainable than clay bricks.
  • They also act as carbon sinks as they fix more carbon dioxide than they produce during their lifecycle.
  • The bricks also provide good insulation to heat and sound
  • They help in maintaining humidity of buildings and make the house more suitable for hot-humid climates.

The bricks will help in building climate change resilient homes. In India as 84 to 141 million tons of agricultural wastes are burnt causing severe air pollution, these steps help in reducing these incidents.